A quick guide to neuroimaging

February 4, 2013 at 10:44 am | Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments
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My latest videos (also available on YouTube) are three short, simple introductions to the remarkable neuroscientific techniques of neuroimaging, dealing with fMRI, PET, and MEG.

fMRI: functional magnetic resonance imaging.

PET: positron emission tomography.

MEG: magnetoencephalography. (This one also discusses EEG, electroencephalography.)

(Apologies for the fit of the giggles that overtook my interviewer, and then me, in the MEG video, requiring some urgent, but rather amateur, editing.)

My hope is that these guides will be useful to students starting out, and to anyone who wants a quick briefing on what happens in brain scans. I’ve tried to keep the talks short, clear, and as fluent as possible. I’ve put slides in at intervals to help summarise the material, and there are some questions at the end for those who’d like pointers to further study.

A quick guide to epigenetics

January 28, 2013 at 10:27 am | Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments
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My latest video (also available on YouTube) is a short, simple introduction to the new and exciting science of epigenetics.

My hope is that it will be useful to students starting out, and to anyone who wants a quick briefing on what epigenetics is about. There’s a free guide to genetics included, necessarily!

I’ve tried to keep these talks short, clear, and as fluent as possible. I’ve put slides in at intervals to help summarise the material, and there are some questions at the end for those who’d like pointers to further study.

Into the brave new world … of video

January 14, 2013 at 2:54 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments
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Today I’m trying a new experiment. New for me, at least, and scary, though no doubt many of you will be past masters at it. I’m posting a video on YouTube. It’s the first of a planned series of short, simple talks about neuroscience, and it’s an introductory guide to what’s where in human brains.

My hope is that it will be useful to students starting out, and to others interested in learning more about brains and the methods used to study them. If you’d like to look a little beyond the headlines and pretty pictures of fMRI, for instance, there’ll be a talk on that coming soon.

I’ve tried to keep the talks short, clear, and as fluent as possible, although, as I soon found out, it’s extremely difficult to talk coherently for minutes at a time about any subject, even one you know well.

Finally, the biggest disadvantage to this project, from my point of view, is that it’s video. My childish sympathy for the old idea that photographing someone stole their soul has been overlaid in adulthood by a properly scientific doubt as to whether people have souls – but I retain the child’s dislike of being imaged. However, communication works better when you can see the communicator. And this is such an important topic to communicate. So here goes.

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